Welcome


Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement Questionnaire

Step In and Speak Out for the Great Lakes: How Do You Think the Lakes are Doing?

The International Joint Commission (IJC), a Canadian-United States treaty organization that prevents and resolves disputes concerning boundary waters, is interested in your thoughts about the health of the lakes.

The IJC is responsible for monitoring progress to restore and protect the Great Lakes based on goals and objectives Canada and the United States agreed to in the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (Agreement). The IJC produce a progress report every three years, and will consider this as well as input and advice from the Great Lakes advisory boards and basin residents to determine what’s working well and what needs more attention to ensure the lakes are healthy and thriving. The IJC will include their thoughts and key issues raised by the public in their Triennial Assessment of Progress Report, which will be released in spring 2020.

The IJC visited communities around the basin this past summer and fall to hear from residents, and they want to hear from you. The following questionnaire should take about 10 minutes to complete, and will contribute significantly to their overall assessment of progress to restore and protect the lakes. If you’re not sure about an answer, feel free to answer just those questions that you feel comfortable with.

Take the Survey

Please share the questionnaire with others so they may contribute their thoughts.  Submit your views by November 30, 2019.


Northern Lakeshore Trail Connectivity Plan

The purpose of the Northern Lakeshore Trail Connectivity Plan is to improve walking and bicycling connections between and among the five northern lakeshore communities of Zion, Winthrop Harbor, Beach Park, Waukegan, and North Chicago. Funded in part by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) Coastal Management Program, a key objective of this plan is to identify potential bicycle and pedestrian routes between partner communities and Illinois Beach State Park, as well as other recreational open spaces along the lakefront and within the study area. The study area is bounded roughly by the municipal limits of the partner communities, stretching approximately from the Wisconsin State line to the City of North Chicago’s southern municipal limit, and from the Lake Michigan shoreline west to the Robert McClory Bike Path.

Check the plan website often or sign up for email updates to be notified of upcoming events and ways to be involved.



In 1981, prompted by the discovery of high levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in harbor sediments, Waukegan Harbor was designated as a Superfund site (see Superfund Process) and independently named as one of 43 Areas of Concern* (AOC) on the Great Lakes by the International Joint Commission, U.S. EPA and IEPA.  The harbor was identified as an AOC using protocols developed by the United States and Canada under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987.

*(What is an AOC and how has the program addressed contamination in the Great Lake basin? View a short video – AOC 101 – created by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources)

The Waukegan Harbor Citizens Advisory Group (CAG) was formed by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) in 1990 to assume a leadership role in developing a remedial action plan (RAP) for the Waukegan Harbor AOC. The harbor at one time had the largest known concentrations of PCBs and PCB-contaminated sediments.

In addition to reducing contamination in the harbor, the CAG also worked with state and local government officials to deal with the open dumping of litter, garbage and tires, and has worked to identify older commercial properties that are candidates for redevelopment. The CAG received a Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GRLI) Grant to restore portions of the Glen Flora Ravine and the coastal habitat located south of Illinois Beach State Park to the City of Waukegan public beach.

The membership of the CAG is representative of diverse community interests.  CAG meetings provide a public forum for representatives from business, education, government, industry, environment, civic and recreation interests and the local citizenry to present and discuss their needs and concerns related to the decision-making process at the Waukegan Harbor AOC.  The CAG has spearheaded the implementation of the RAP. See: Waukegan Harbor Remedial Action Plan Final Stage iii Report 1999.

In late October 1998, the Waukegan Harbor CAG was presented the State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) “Success Story” award for their efforts to restore Waukegan Harbor’s beneficial uses. The award says “The SOLEC 98 Steering Committee and the Canadian and the United States Consuls General extend their sincere congratulations to all those who have participated in the Waukegan Harbor environmental activities. Successful efforts such as yours serve to inspire and encourage others to assume responsibility and take an active role in the improvement of the Great Lakes ecosystem.”

In 2013, the final environmental dredge of Waukegan Harbor was completed thanks to the efforts of staff at the US and Illinois EPA, local, state and federal elected officials, representatives from industries located around the harbor and from the efforts of residents who were committed to seeing that the cleanup would meet rigorous environmental standards in order to protect the public. As of January 2018 , the Waukegan AOC is two thirds of the way through the Beneficial Use Impairment (BUI) delisting process and well on the way to being declared an Area in Recovery.

The Waukegan Harbor CAG will continue to work with local,  state and federal agencies to assure that the remaining contaminated sites located along the Waukegan lakefront are remediated and the remaining BUIs are delisted. The CAG will promote stewardship of the lakefront and work with others to protect this great asset for the people of Waukegan, Lake County and Northeastern Illinois.